Author: Leicester Student Magazine

REVIEW: Dune (2021)

by Auden Chamberlain It is difficult to find any piece of work since 1965 in the science-fiction genre that does not bear a debt to Frank Herbert’s seminal novel Dune. Perhaps the most notable example would be the desert landscapes and “spice mines” of Star Wars (1977), but clear influence can be felt almost anywhere – from Fallout to Game of Thrones. It’s perhaps that legendary status that means Dune has been such a difficult nut for Hollywood to crack, despite its obvious popularity. How do you make something fresh that’s been aped countless times in countless ways? Attempts have been made previously: Alejandro Jodorowsky’s infamously fell apart, leaving a young and precocious David Lynch to pick up the pieces. His effort, released in 1984, came together in such a way that Lynch wanted to remove his name from the credits, and is something he considers a “huge, gigantic sadness in [his] life”. An admittedly terrible adaptation of the book (and one that Lynch contends he had no creative control over), it is still an …

REVIEW: No Time to Die

Written by Auden Chamberlain It feels almost impossible to imagine the backlash Daniel Craig’s casting as James Bond received thanks to his blue eyes and blond hair, for these very features now feel almost intrinsically linked to the character. Craig’s Bond feels less like an incarnation to be replaced as his predecessors and more like his own distinct character. From his origin in 2006’s Casino Royale, we followed him through a set of interweaving plots over 15 years before reaching the grand conclusion: No Time To Die. Whereas previous Bond’s would simply go on a self-contained mission, this era was perhaps modernised by the connections each entry would have to the previous, and whilst it was this very method that helped make Craig’s Bond the cinematic icon he is, it also fills the series with a layer of convolution. It doesn’t feel unfair to say that No Time To Die was left with the burden that is its predecessor: Spectre. A dull, joyless drag that commits the ultimate sin of sequel: rendering what came before …

Escape

Written by Luke Bailey I want to go for a drive. But I can’t, I don’t own a car. I want to sit behind the wheel and blast my way down a motorway. In any direction so long as it’s away. But I can’t, there’s a pandemic raging.  I want to lose myself to the music blaring out of tinny car speakers, as I leave everything behind me. But I can’t. I could just get up, right now as I write this, and go. I could disappear off the face of the earth for a week. Or more. But I can’t. My housemate would worry. I can’t just disappear.  I wish I could drive as far as possible, and then still keep going. Driving until I am hidden in the midst of the Scottish Highlands. I would be untraceable, uncontactable. I would be free. Just a few days without the constant pressure pushing me back down. But I can’t.  I could immerse myself in books and music and the beauty of the wilderness. I could walk among the trees and the …

Student-led maths petiton opposes job cuts

Written by Max Ashforth Petitions arise over defunding to the pure mathematics department at the University of Leicester. Freddie Mansfield, a third-year student, and Hannah Amliwala, a second-year student, recently started a student-led petition, that has gained 87 signatures, as of 4 March. This petition was set up in response to one set up by staff, which has been signed by over 1,000 people. The recent announcement has not been supported by all students, as Freddie stated: “I can’t see any positives about how the changes would benefit maths students.” The changes set out by University of Leicester Vice-Chancellor, Professor Nishan Canagarajah, include the redundancies of 12 pure mathematics lecturers. These redundancies would be followed by the appointment of three teaching roles. Currently, staff split their time between teaching and researching the subject, however the plan is for this to be reduced to just teaching roles. It is feared that reducing the number of staff in the department would deter prospective students from applying to the university. The long-term impact and knock-on effects, which would …