Author: Leicester Student Magazine

Music Monthly: the tunes that got us through January

Written by Harry Featherston Shame – Drunk Tank Pink Written and recorded shortly after their mammoth 2018 tour (which included a gig at the University’s very own O2 Academy), the hotly-anticipated sophomore album from London post-punk outfit Shame is a worthy successor to their acclaimed debut, Songs of Praise. The aftermath of that tour saw frontman Charlie Steen locking himself away (even before it became a legal requirement), and experimenting with his music in isolation as a reaction to the non-stop action of his life at the time. As a result, the lyrics here reach deep into the recesses of his mind, raising questions of identity and loneliness amidst an atmosphere of panicked claustrophobia, created by the frenetic guitar work of Eddie Green and Sean Coyle-Smith. Given the current state of the world, these themes will resonate with listeners more than the band probably intended, and the album sounds all the better for it.   Sleaford Mods – Spare Ribs While blending elements of electronic, hip-hop, and punk, Sleaford Mods have gained a reputation for being …

“Crisis point” in student education as hopes of fee refunds are dashed by universities minister

Written by Ed Morrison Last week, in response to a question about tuition fee refunds from a red-faced Piers Morgan, the universities minister, Michelle Donelan, exclaimed: “We set the maximum level of tuition fees and it is up to universities to then decide what they are going to charge.” Donelan’s OIA level advice rejects any proposal for the government to pay students compensation for their undervalued tuition and is a bitter pill to swallow for those, like myself, who felt reinvigorated and hopeful that change was on the horizon, especially after a government petition for reduced tuition fees received over 550,000 signatures. In light of this, it is perhaps unsurprising that this latest government advice has fallen on deaf ears among students, who feel sick and tired at the treatment they have received this academic year. These views are expressed in a new poll by the University of Leicester Students’ Union as part of a new ‘Tuition Fees Campaign.’ Organised by the SU President, Mia Nembhard, she hopes it will “help get as many students …

QUIZ: How much do you know about the history of Valentine’s Day?

Written by Laura May Bailey. These days, the 14th of February is associated with cheesy cards, chocolates, and love songs. But it hasn’t always been this way. Valentine’s Day has a rich history dating back to Roman times and touching on mythology, imprisonment and even, gruesomely, animal sacrifice. How much do you know about the history of this unofficial holiday? 1. How many Saint Valentines does the Catholic Church recognise? a. Three b. Two c. Five d. Four 2. In the third century, Emperor Claudius II of Rome outlawed marriage for young men. A priest named Valentine continued to perform marriages for young couples in secret, until he was discovered and killed. Why did Claudius II outlaw marriage? a. Due to a disagreement between Claudius II and a religious leader b. To control the population of Rome c. To encourage young men to become soldiers d. To prevent his son marrying a woman he disliked 3. Some people argue that Valentine’s Day is the Christianised version of a Roman celebration, Lupercalia, which was traditionally celebrated …

Romantic reads to help you survive Valentine’s Day

Written by Jessie Mearns It seems that Valentine’s day 2021, though still happening, won`t be as expected. Undoubtedly, no matter with, who or how you will be spending Valentine’s day, the coronavirus pandemic will be placing a limit on your celebrations. As someone who personally has never enjoyed the day, many a time have I been craving a bit of romantic escapism; and this year it seems more relevant than ever. For anyone searching for a romance novel worth the read, I am here to tell you my best picks, from both the classic to the contemporary. Novels that made me believe I was born in the wrong era. Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen. A classic ode to the romantic era and a staple of the genre, Pride and Prejudice is well known for both its moral teachings and unmatched romance. Following the protagonist Elizabeth Bennet, it documents her emotional journey to discovering she completely misjudged the initial assumption of the seemingly taciturn Mr Darcy. Clashing personalities of the rather outspoken Lizzie and the pompous …