All posts filed under: Arts & Culture

Virgil Abloh: A Legacy in Fashion and Beyond

Creative Director of Louis Vuitton and founder of Off-White, Virgil Abloh, sadly passed away on 28 November 2021. Aged just 41, his contribution to fashion and music throughout his career has made him one of the most legendary names in the creative industries. Virgil was one of the most innovative creatives to walk the Earth. I do not say this lightly – who else can add “walking” onto trainers and make them look incredible? He founded Off-White in 2013, a company known for chunky quotation marks, zip ties, capital letters and hazard tape. Despite losing the LVMH award in 2014 (LVMH being a French holding multinational corporation which oversees many notable fashion houses, including Loewe, Fendi, Celine, Christian Dior and Louis Vuitton), his brand is arguably one of the most recognised and iconic in the world. One of my favourite pieces is from the Resort 2021 Womenswear and is modelled by his good friend, Bella Hadid. The electric blue mini dress is just stunning and acts as such a beautiful combo with the patent leather …

REVIEW: Dune (2021)

by Auden Chamberlain It is difficult to find any piece of work since 1965 in the science-fiction genre that does not bear a debt to Frank Herbert’s seminal novel Dune. Perhaps the most notable example would be the desert landscapes and “spice mines” of Star Wars (1977), but clear influence can be felt almost anywhere – from Fallout to Game of Thrones. It’s perhaps that legendary status that means Dune has been such a difficult nut for Hollywood to crack, despite its obvious popularity. How do you make something fresh that’s been aped countless times in countless ways? Attempts have been made previously: Alejandro Jodorowsky’s infamously fell apart, leaving a young and precocious David Lynch to pick up the pieces. His effort, released in 1984, came together in such a way that Lynch wanted to remove his name from the credits, and is something he considers a “huge, gigantic sadness in [his] life”. An admittedly terrible adaptation of the book (and one that Lynch contends he had no creative control over), it is still an …

REVIEW: No Time to Die

Written by Auden Chamberlain It feels almost impossible to imagine the backlash Daniel Craig’s casting as James Bond received thanks to his blue eyes and blond hair, for these very features now feel almost intrinsically linked to the character. Craig’s Bond feels less like an incarnation to be replaced as his predecessors and more like his own distinct character. From his origin in 2006’s Casino Royale, we followed him through a set of interweaving plots over 15 years before reaching the grand conclusion: No Time To Die. Whereas previous Bond’s would simply go on a self-contained mission, this era was perhaps modernised by the connections each entry would have to the previous, and whilst it was this very method that helped make Craig’s Bond the cinematic icon he is, it also fills the series with a layer of convolution. It doesn’t feel unfair to say that No Time To Die was left with the burden that is its predecessor: Spectre. A dull, joyless drag that commits the ultimate sin of sequel: rendering what came before …

Book Burning is not the only solution – Janette Winterson’s very public protest

Written by Georgia Hilton-Buckley On Friday June 4th, Jeanette Winterson tweeted a photo of burning books, made significantly more interesting because they were her own books. Winterson, famed author of Oranges are not the only fruit and Sexing the Cherry, burned the republished editions of several of her previous works because she detested the ‘cosy’ blurb which sectioned her into ‘wimmin’s fiction’. I have read a few of Winterson’s novels and greatly admired them, but the prospect of burning books greatly upset me. The history of book burning Burning books has always been a symbol of censorship under both the reign of Nazi Germany, the destruction of the Library of Baghdad and the Burning of Jaffna public library. Under ISIS, burning forbidden texts are common acts of taunting Western media and is probably the most recent act of cultural genocide. Although Winterson is burning her own books, it still sends a strong message that literature can be erased. When the author who shall not be named (Creator of Harry Potter) posted a transphobic essay, many …

Content houses: the business model turning the young, privileged and problematic into social media megastars

TikTok is everywhere. Even if you’re too stubborn to download the app itself, you probably will still have heard of the likes Addison Rae and Charli D’Amilio. Stars of the video-sharing app are making a name for themselves in the ‘real world’, and it’s safe to say that a noticeable amount of popular content creators belong to, or at least used to belong to, a content house.